Yellowtail kingfish

Quality mark Cultivation
/Keurmerk Wild
Green
Second choice
Avoid
Bycatch

Yellowtail kingfish

Seriola lalandi
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Origin

Indian Ocean, east (FAO 57)

Cultivation- / Catchmethod

Net pens/ Cages

Source usage
Impact on the environment
Management
Final assessment
Explanation assessment

Yellowtail kingfish is farmed increasingly at more places. The young fish used for the aquaculture do not come from the wild. the farming in cages in the sea is not the most environmental friendly option due to fact that not eaten feed and waste come directly in the sea and diseases spread easily to and from wild fish. There is still relatively much wild fish needed for the farming of this fish: for 1 kg farmed fish about 4 kg wild fish is caught.

 

 

 

Yellowtail kingfish

Seriola lalandi
  • Jan
  • Feb
  • Mar
  • Apr
  • May
  • Jun
  • Jul
  • Aug
  • Sep
  • Oct
  • Nov
  • Dec
Origin

Pacific Ocean, south-west (FAO 81)

Cultivation- / Catchmethod

Handlines and pole-lines (hand operated)

Fish stocks and fishing pressure
Ecosystem effects
Fishery management
Final assessment
Explanation assessment

Yellowtail kingfish is a popular fish in New-Zealand, for both professional and recreational fishermen. Catches are being monitored, but the size of the stock is unknown.

The handline fishery is very selective with little [bycatch] and no discardsDiscards:
Unwanted by-catch, which is thrown back because there is no quota, the market price is too low, or the fish is below the legal minimum landing size. Discards can be alive or dead.
. For this fishery baitfish are caught. The long-term consequences of catching baitfish are unclear but probably minimal. The fishery does no damage to vulnerable [habitats].

The management of this fishery in New-Zealand waters is partially effective.

 

Yellowtail kingfish

Seriola lalandi
  • Jan
  • Feb
  • Mar
  • Apr
  • May
  • Jun
  • Jul
  • Aug
  • Sep
  • Oct
  • Nov
  • Dec
Origin

Asia

Cultivation- / Catchmethod

Net pens/ Cages

Source usage
Impact on the environment
Management
Final assessment
Explanation assessment

Yellowtail kingfish is farmed increasingly at more places. The young fish used for the aquaculture do not come from the wild. the farming in cages in the sea is not the most environmental friendly option due to fact that not eaten feed and waste come directly in the sea and diseases spread easily to and from wild fish. The management and feed used differs strongly between Asian countries and farms. At some farms industrial feed is used but there is also still feeding with locally caught small “trash fish”.

 

 

 

Yellowtail kingfish

Seriola lalandi
  • Jan
  • Feb
  • Mar
  • Apr
  • May
  • Jun
  • Jul
  • Aug
  • Sep
  • Oct
  • Nov
  • Dec
Origin

Pacific Ocean, south-west (FAO 81)

Cultivation- / Catchmethod

Bottom otter trawl, Set longlines, Gillnets

Fish stocks and fishing pressure
Ecosystem effects
Fishery management
Final assessment
Explanation assessment

Yellowtail kingfish is a popular fish in New-Zealand, for both professional and recreational fishermen. Catches are being monitored, but the size of the stock is unknown.

There is no focused fishery on this fish, but is a popular bycatch in several fisheries. In these fisheries there are several problems: in longline and gillnet fisheries there is bycatch of seabirds and dolphins. Trawling fisheries have bycatch of dolphins and besides that they do heavy damage to the bottom ecosystem.

The management of this fishery in New-Zealand waters is partially effective.

 

General

Yellowtail kingfish

Yellowtail kingfish is family of the jacks and jack mackerel and has some features that show similarities with tuna. Yellowtail kingfish occurs in deeper waters in the Southern Ocean near Australia, New-Zealand and South Africa. This species can get up to 180 cm long and weigh 90 kg. It is a well-known species in Japan. Since 2017, this species is also grown in aquaculture in Zeeland, the Netherlands.