Rose Fish

Quality mark Cultivation
/Keurmerk Wild
Green
Second choice
Avoid
Bycatch

Rose Fish

Sebastes marinus/norvegicus
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Origin

Atlantic Ocean, north-east (FAO 27)

Farming- / Catch method

Danish seine, Bottom otter trawl, Hooks and lines, Gillnets

Rose Fish

Sebastes marinus/norvegicus
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Origin

Atlantic Ocean, north-east (FAO 27)
Deelgebieden: Barents sea

Farming- / Catch method

Bottom otter trawl

Fish stocks and fishing pressure
Ecosystem effects
Fishery management
Final assessment
Explanation assessment

The stock of rose fish in the Barents Sea is overfishedOverfished:
A stock is overfished when the stock size has decreased so far that it can no longer produce a maximum sustainable yield. The size of the fish populations is insufficient to reproduce in the long term. 
. The stock is on the lowest level ever. The [fishing pressure] is much too high. Rose fish is very vulnerable to fishing pressure because the grow slowly and reach sexual maturity only after ten years.

Rose fish is a deep-sea species and often resides between centuries old cold-water corals. These corals have a great risk of being destroyed by bottom trawls. In some areas, mainly around Norway, the coral areas are closed for bottom trawls.

The management is largely effective. It is difficult for the management to differentiate between the two species of redfish. Two species of redfish are living in overlapping areas. In certain areas there are no separate [catch limit] for both species, and they are not differentiated when landed. According to ICESICES:
International Council for the Exploration of the Sea, an international organization dedicated to research and advice for a sustainable use of the oceans. 
, the fishery on redfish in the Barents Sea should be fully closed.

Rose Fish

Sebastes marinus/norvegicus
  • Jan
  • Feb
  • Mar
  • Apr
  • May
  • Jun
  • Jul
  • Aug
  • Sep
  • Oct
  • Nov
  • Dec
Origin

Atlantic Ocean, north-east (FAO 27)
Deelgebieden: Barents sea

Farming- / Catch method

Gillnets

Fish stocks and fishing pressure
Ecosystem effects
Fishery management
Final assessment
Explanation assessment

The stock of rose fish in the Barents Sea is overfishedOverfished:
A stock is overfished when the stock size has decreased so far that it can no longer produce a maximum sustainable yield. The size of the fish populations is insufficient to reproduce in the long term. 
. The stock is on the lowest level ever. The [fishing pressure] is much too high. Rose fish is very vulnerable to fishing pressure because the grow slowly and reach sexual maturity only after ten years.

Rose fish is a deep-sea species and often resides between centuries old cold-water corals. It is unknown if the [gillnet fishery] damages these vulnerable habitats. In some areas, mainly around Norway, the coral areas are closed for bottom trawls. There is much bycatchBycatch:
Species caught next to species targeted for fishery. By-catches can consist of non-commercial species and species that are too small, and can be kept (this part is sometimes called by-product) or thrown back into the sea (discards). 
of rose fish in the Russian pelagicPelagic:
In the water column.
fishery.

The management is largely effective. It is difficult for the management to differentiate between the two species of redfish. Two species of redfish are living in overlapping areas. In certain areas there is not a separate [catch limit] for both species, and they are not differentiated when landed. According to ICESICES:
International Council for the Exploration of the Sea, an international organization dedicated to research and advice for a sustainable use of the oceans. 
, the fishery on redfish in the Barents Sea should be fully closed.

Rose Fish

Sebastes marinus/norvegicus
  • Jan
  • Feb
  • Mar
  • Apr
  • May
  • Jun
  • Jul
  • Aug
  • Sep
  • Oct
  • Nov
  • Dec
Origin

Atlantic Ocean, north-east (FAO 27)
Deelgebieden: Iceland and Faroes grounds

Farming- / Catch method

Bottom otter trawl

Fish stocks and fishing pressure
Ecosystem effects
Fishery management
Final assessment
Explanation assessment

The Icelandic stock of rose fish seems to increase again after a period of overfishingOverfishing:
There is so much fish caught that the size of the stock has diminished so far that it can no longer produce a maximum sustainable yield. The size of the fish populations is insufficient to reproduce in the long term. 
. The [fishing pressure] has decreased. Rose fish is very vulnerable to fishing pressure because the grow slowly and reach sexual maturity only after ten years. Two species of redfish occur in overlapping areas. The stock of deep-sea redfish is still not doing well.

Fishing is done with [bottom otter trawls] and [pelagic otter trawls]. Rose fish is a deep-sea species and often resides between centuries old cold-water corals. These corals are at risk of being destroyed by this fishery. There is little bycatch, but the survivability is very low because the fish don’t survive the transport from the deep-sea to the surface.

The management in the Icelandic fishery zone is better done than the other catching areas. There are for example closed nursery areas. It is difficult for the management to differentiate between the two species of redfish and they are often not differentiated when landed.  In certain areas there are no separate [catch limits] for both species. There are no management agreements between the different states using this fish stock.

General

Rose Fish

Rose fish is similar to Deepwater redfish, but differs in size. Deepwater redfish reaches up to 55 cm, which is significantly smaller than the rose fish which can reach up to 1 meter. However, they are mostly caught at sizes of 25-50 cm. Juvenile rose fish live in fjords, bays and coastal zones. When they reach maturity, the migrate to deeper sees. They are found at 100-500 m deep. They are slow moving, gregarious fish and eat deepsea shrimp and herring.