Cape hake

Quality mark Cultivation
/Keurmerk Wild
Green
Second choice
Avoid
Bycatch

Cape hake

Merluccius capensis, Merluccius paradoxus
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Origin

Atlantic Ocean, south-east (FAO 47)

Cultivation- / Catchmethod

Bottom otter trawl

Explanation assessment

The South African bottom otter trawl fishery on Cape hake is certified with the MSC label in 2004. It is a bottom fishery with trawls, with fishing occurring during the day, when hakes are schooling on the bottom.

There are two kinds of Cape hake. The certified coastal fishery focuses on Merluccius capensi, while the off-shore fishery focuses on Merluccius paradoxus.

 

Cape hake

Merluccius capensis, Merluccius paradoxus
  • Jan
  • Feb
  • Mar
  • Apr
  • May
  • Jun
  • Jul
  • Aug
  • Sep
  • Oct
  • Nov
  • Dec
Origin

Atlantic Ocean, south-east (FAO 47)
Deelgebieden: Angola

Cultivation- / Catchmethod

Set longlines

Fish stocks and fishing pressure
Ecosystem effects
Fishery management
Final assessment
Explanation assessment

The fishing pressure on Cape hake in the Namibian waters is high, but Cape hake is, like some other fish species, less vulnerable to a high fishing pressure. The species seems to be not overfished.

The fishery on Cape hake is a bottom fishery with longlines, with fishing occurring during the day, when hakes are schooling on the bottom. There is little known about bycatch in this fishery but it is estimated to be low.

There are two species of Cape hake. Merluccius capensis lives at 100-350 m depth and Merluccius paradoxus lives at 300-600 m depth. These species are managed as one species. The management in Namibian waters consists of [catch limits] and the closing of shallow seawaters for the fishery.

 

Cape hake

Merluccius capensis, Merluccius paradoxus
  • Jan
  • Feb
  • Mar
  • Apr
  • May
  • Jun
  • Jul
  • Aug
  • Sep
  • Oct
  • Nov
  • Dec
Origin

Atlantic Ocean, south-east (FAO 47)
Deelgebieden: Angola

Cultivation- / Catchmethod

Bottom otter trawl

Fish stocks and fishing pressure
Ecosystem effects
Fishery management
Final assessment
Explanation assessment

The fishing pressure on Cape hake in the Namibian waters is high, but Cape hake is, like some other fish species, less vulnerable to a high fishing pressure. The species seems to be not overfished.

The fishery on Cape hake is a bottom fishery with trawls, with fishing occurring during the day, when hakes are schooling on the bottom. There is little known about bycatch in this fishery, but it is estimated to be low.

There are two species of Cape hake. Merluccius capensis lives at 100-350 m depth and Merluccius paradoxus lives at 300-600 m depth. These species are managed as one species. The management in Namibian waters consists of [catch limits] and the closing of shallow seawaters for the fishery.

 

General

Cape hake

There are two Cape hake species. Their distribution ranges overlap, however Merluccius paradoxus can primarily be found in deeper waters between 200 and 100 m depth. Merluccius capensis lives closer to the coast at shallower depths, up to 50 m. Merluccius paradoxus has a maximum length of 115 cm and is smaller than Merluccius capensis which can grow up to 140 cm.