Alaska Pollock

Quality mark Cultivation
/Keurmerk Wild
Green
Second choice
Avoid
Bycatch

Alaska Pollock

Theragra chalcogramma
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Origin

Pacific Ocean, north-east (FAO 67)
Deelgebieden: Pacific Ocean, north-east

Farming- / Catch method

Midwater otter trawl, Trawls

Explanation assessment

The Alaska pollock fishery in the eastern Bering Sea, along the Aleutian Islands and in the Gulf of Alaska has been MSC-certifiedMSC Certified:
Fisheries that comply with the Marine Stewardship Council assessment criteria and are certified. Fish products with the blue MSC label are caught by sustainable fisheries.
in 2005. This fishery mainly uses midwaterMidwater otter trawls:
A fishing technique whereby conical nets are dragged through the water column and are kept open by large square 'otter planks'.  
otter trawls. These are trawl nets that are towed through the water column and therefore have no impact on the seabed.

Since 2013, the Russian Alaska pollock fishery in the Sea of Okhotsk has also been MSC-certifiedMSC Certified:
Fisheries that comply with the Marine Stewardship Council assessment criteria and are certified. Fish products with the blue MSC label are caught by sustainable fisheries.
.

Fish in season 

Fish is in season when the spawning period has ended, as the quality is then at its best.

 

Alaska Pollock

Theragra chalcogramma
  • Jan
  • Feb
  • Mar
  • Apr
  • May
  • Jun
  • Jul
  • Aug
  • Sep
  • Oct
  • Nov
  • Dec
Origin

Pacific Ocean, north-west (FAO 61)

Farming- / Catch method

Danish seine

Fish stocks and fishing pressure
Ecosystem effects
Fishery management
Final assessment
Explanation assessment

Alaska pollock is a species that is often used to make kibbeling and fish sticks. This species is currently not being overfishedOverfished:
A stock is overfished when the stock size has decreased so far that it can no longer produce a maximum sustainable yield. The size of the fish populations is insufficient to reproduce in the long term. 
.

The ecological impact of the catch method, danishDanish seines:
A fishing technique whereby one of the lines of the seine net/pit net is anchored. The ship expands the net with a moving motion and turns off when picking up the net.
seines, can momentarily not be evaluated due to low confidence in the bycatchBycatch:
Species caught next to species targeted for fishery. By-catches can consist of non-commercial species and species that are too small, and can be kept (this part is sometimes called by-product) or thrown back into the sea (discards). 
information. In addition, the impact the method has on habitats can therefore not be determined.

The overall management is seen as partially effective.

Fish in season 

Fish is in season when the spawning period has ended, as the quality is then at its best.

Alaska Pollock

Theragra chalcogramma
  • Jan
  • Feb
  • Mar
  • Apr
  • May
  • Jun
  • Jul
  • Aug
  • Sep
  • Oct
  • Nov
  • Dec
Origin

Pacific Ocean, north-west (FAO 61)

Farming- / Catch method

Trawls

Fish stocks and fishing pressure
Ecosystem effects
Fishery management
Final assessment
Explanation assessment

Alaska pollock is a species that is often used to make kibbeling and fish sticks. This species is currently not heavily overfishedOverfished:
A stock is overfished when the stock size has decreased so far that it can no longer produce a maximum sustainable yield. The size of the fish populations is insufficient to reproduce in the long term. 
. It is estimated that the stock wil increase in the upcoming years. Alaska pollock is not very susceptible to fishing pressureFishing pressure:
Fishing pressure is a result of the fishing effort/amount of fishing on a stock, which determines the fishing mortality. Fishing mortality is the share of the fish stock that dies annually as a result of fishing.
.

Alaska pollock is mostly caught with demersalDemersal otter trawls:
A technique in which conical nets are dragged over the ground and are held open by large, square 'otter planks'. The planks also work as a plough, in which fish are hunted into the nets.
otter trawls. This fishery has a large ecological impact. Furthermore, it has a high percentage of bycatchBycatch:
Species caught next to species targeted for fishery. By-catches can consist of non-commercial species and species that are too small, and can be kept (this part is sometimes called by-product) or thrown back into the sea (discards). 
and the survival rates of these discardsDiscards:
Unwanted by-catch, which is thrown back because there is no quota, the market price is too low, or the fish is below the legal minimum landing size. Discards can be alive or dead.
is supposed to be low.

The overall management is seen as partially effective.

Fish in season 

Fish is in season when the spawning period has ended, as the quality is then at its best.

 

General

Cod-like fish

Cod-like fishes belong to the Gadidae family. This includes the Atlantic and Pacific cod, pouting, haddock, whiting, European pollock, Alaska pollock and saithe. They live near the seabed in coastal waters and in deeper waters. During the day, they aggregate in schools. At night, they separate to forage independently. Gadidae are omnivorous fish that feed on worms, molluscs, bivalves, crustaceans and small fish. They migrate over large distances to spawn and to hunt on large schools of herring and smelt.

 

 

Alaska Pollock

Alaska pollock is the most eaten pollock in the Netherlands. It is found in the Arctic regions of the Pacific Ocean, from 0-1300 m of depth. They have a daily migration from deep in the ocean to shallower water to feed. Alaska pollock is in the family of cod. It reaches a length of 91 cm and a weight of 1.4 kg.